Mama says : Eat your Yolks!

How many eggs should I consume a day?

Should I consume the yolk, too? Isn’t all the cholesterol there?

Egg yolk? No, thanks. Gimme the white part, there’s where all the protein is.

These are the questions I get when I start talking about the EGG topic.

First and foremost, let’s make one thing clear. The yolk is the most nutritious part of the egg. Why? Consider the definition of The Yolk below.

Definition of The Yolk

Definition: Cytoplasm stored in an egg that contains nutritional reserves for the developing embryo. It is rich in polysaccharides, lipids, and proteins.

Bear in mind an egg without the yolk does not hatch chicks. J

Not convinced? Study the link below.

www.cholesterol-and-health.com/Egg_Yolk.html

Below is an excerpt of the above link for your reference. Note the nutritional content difference of the white and the yolk.

Egg Nutrition: Yolk vs. White

Egg yolks are indeed full of cholesterol. Like most cholesterol-rich foods, they are jam-packed full of important nutrients, especially the fat-soluble vitamins and essential fatty acids.

In fact, the slew of nutrients in an egg yolk is so comprehensive that a few a day would offer better insurance than a multi-vitamin. Most importantly, the yolk contains most of the nutrients in an egg.

Egg whites, on the other hand, contain far fewer nutrients. The only thing that could justify their consumption is their attachment to their companion yolk.

Don’t believe it? Below is a table that compares the nutritional value of egg whites and yolks, with data provided by the USDA. I’ve included additional analysis in the last two columns that provides the percentage of the total nutrition found in the yolk and the percentage of total nutrition found in the white.

Table 1: Egg Yolks Versus Egg Whites

Nutrient

White

Yolk

% Total in White

% Total in Yolk

Protein

3.6 g

2.7g

57%

43%

Fat

0.05g

4.5g

1%

99%

Calcium

2.3 mg

21.9 mg

9.5%

90.5%

Magnesium

3.6 mg

0.85 mg

80.8%

19.2%

Iron

0.03 mg

0.4 mg

6.2%

93.8%

Phosphorus

5 mg

66.3 mg

7%

93%

Potassium

53.8 mg

18.5 mg

74.4%

25.6%

Sodium

54.8 mg

8.2 mg

87%

13%

Zinc

0.01 mg

0.4 mg

0.2%

99.8%

Copper

0.008 mg

0.013 mg

38%

62%

Manganese

0.004 mg

0.009 mg

30.8%

69.2%

Selenium

6.6 mcg

9.5 mcg

41%

59%

Thiamin

0.01 mg

0.03 mg

3.2%

96.8%

Riboflavin

0.145 mg

0.09 mg

61.7%

48.3%

Niacin

0.035 mg

0.004 mg

89.7%

9.3%

Pantothenic acid.

0.63 mg

0.51 mg

11%

89%

B6

0.002 mg

0.059 mg

3.3%

96.7%

Folate

1.3 mcg

24.8 mcg

5%

95%

B12

0.03 mcg

0.331 mcg

8.3%

91.7%

Vitamin A

0 IU

245 IU

0%

100%

Vitamin E

0 mg

0.684 mg

0%

100%

Vitamin D

0 IU

18.3 IU

0%

100%

Vitamin K

0 IU

0.119 IU

0%

100%

DHA and AA

0

94 mg

0%

100%

Carotenoids

0 mcg

21 mcg

0%

100%

Is that enough to convince you to eat the egg whole? I bet, it does.

Now the next part? How many a day?

Well, it depends actually. My rule of thumb is, 2 a day max if you are leading an active lifestyle.

If you are into weight training and building muscle you will need more like 4 – 6 a day. Bodybuilders consume varyingly according to their training phase.

But if you are leading a sedentary lifestyle, 2 a week will do you some good and I do not recommend more than that. It is not because of the egg’s cholesterol that is killing you. By not exercising, your body’s metabolism is slow and foods you consumed, which is not converted into energy will accumulate as fat in your body… a sure fire way to getting high cholesterol… and the egg will just add up to that.

So if you are considering eggs as part of your diet, I would use lifestyle as a gauge to how many eggs you should consume a day.

Then again, you should have your annual blood test to determine your blood cholesterol and sugar levels, as an indication of whether you are suffering from metabolic disorders. Metabolic disorders affects how your body uses sugar, insulin and cholesterol production. This being the case, some might lead an active lifestyle but should not consume so much foods high in cholesterol as the body lack the ability to process it.

This is my take? Tell me if you think otherwise…..

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