Metabolic Syndrome – Random facts from The Insulin-Resistance Diet book

To those of you who have been following my post on metabolic syndrome… here are few important facts i got from ‘The Insulin-resistance Diet – Cheryle R. Hart, MD & Mary Kay Grossman, RD’.

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These facts are important for us to understand metabolic syndrome better and why it affects most modern people.

1. The hormone insulin is the important regulator of your blood glucose levels.

2. If you have more glucose in your body than your cells need, insulin takes extra blood glucose and transports it into fat storage. Blood sugar then returns to normal. This step is important because having high levels of blood glucose is called diabetes and is very damaging to the body.

3. So, insulin’s main job is to regulate blood glucose, and insulin also signals fat storage. When insulin rises and spikes to regulate high blood sugar levels, then more fat is also being stored. This creates some pros and cons when it comes to insulin levels; not enough insulin to regulate high blood sugar levels would result in diabetes, but high insulin levels on a frequent basis will make you fat.

4. The more overwieght your are, the more resistgant to insulin you tend to become. this happens because extra adipose tissue (fat) causes a hormone reaction ( a rise in body cortisol ) that closes the cells’ doors to incoming glucose. The “shunned” glucose has no alternative but to go on to become fat. The good news is that as you lose body fat, the insulin resistance improves, too.

5. If you have insulin resistance, you tend to store most carbohydrates as fat rather than use them as energy. This is probably what has been happening if you’ve been eating low-fat, low-calorie, yet high-carbohydrate foods and are still struggling with your weight.

6. Too much insulin causes sodium retention, which leads to higher blood pressure.

7. Insulin resistance causes changes in blood lipids (dyslipidemia).

8. Insulin resistance can be considered prediabetes. In fact, studies reveal that diabetes is in the making seven years before it can be clinically diagnosed by high sugar levels.

9.The biological, genetic makeup of modern people very closely resembles that of our primitive Ice Age ancestors. Before modern age, the genetic tendency for insulin resistance was actually a benefit for survival. (back then, humans derived their complex carbohydrates from natural foods, modern humans derived their simple carbohydrates from refined foods.)

10. Certain medications can increase the amount of insulin your pancreas secretes. Some of the most common are the thiazide diuretics, like hydrochlorothiazide, and beta-blockers, such as propranolol. These medications are usually prescribed for high blood pressure control.

11. Caffeine, artificial sweeteners, and nicotine can all cause an increase in insulin.

12. High levels of stress can worsen insulin resistance because stress activates our “fight or flight” survival mechanism. This stimulates the production of the stress hormone epinephrine. Epinephrine causes the liver and muscles to change glucose from its reserved state, glycogen, to its active sugar form for energy. This causes the glucose levels to rise. Insulin rises to control high glucose levels. Increased insulin levels then signal fat storing. This explains why some really stressed people cannot lose unwanted weight despite “doing everything right.”

13. The two keys elements for the control of insulin resistance are nutrition and physical activity.

14. Newer prescription medications for diabetes work either by limiting the liver’s release of stored glucose or by letting more glucose into the cells for energy use. ( i prefer using Alpha PSP to encourage more glucose into the cells for energy conversion)

For more information on metabolic syndrome and diagnosing whether you have metabolic syndrome, click here.

For tips on how to combat metabolic syndrome, click here or read the book, ‘The Insulin-resistance Diet – Cheryle R. Hart, MD & Mary Kay Grossman, RD’.

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3 Responses

  1. Hi this blog is great I will be recommending it to friends.

  2. Hi Edward,

    Great post on Metabolic Syndrome.

    I’d love to hear your feedback on lifestyle changes and even how you’ve implemented changes yourself. One our practitioners in the community wrote a post a while back about diagnosing syndrom x by Dr. Allyne Rosenthal – http://www.stopchronicdisease.com/post/do-you-have-metabolic-syndrome

    We’ve also set up an information page as well.

    http://www.stopchronicdisease.com/disease/metabolic-syndrome

    Stop Chronic Disease is an online community that connects chronic illness suffers with practitioners.

    I hope you’ll join us.

    Thanks again for your post.

    Lynne Hackett

    StopChronicDisease.com

    Community Leader

    http://www.stopchronicdisease.com

    http://www.stopchronicdisease.com/profile/lynne_hackett

  3. This is quite a hot information. I’ll share it on Twitter.

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